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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
back there is a storm fence put up. as i understand it, when hurricane irene hit, it came about that far, maybe a little further out. and with a lot of people at first were hesitant to evacuate because they said irene wasn't that bad. most of the damage of flooding was inland and not here on the coast. as you can see, the coast is just washed away. it's completely gone. as i said, it extends perhaps about 100 yards outs in na direction. the same situation from the north and cape may in the south, down near at alantic city towards the tip of new jersey and the garden state parkway the main highway into that area, which bisects of entire state, has been closed off because they don't want people to go back into that area. it's completely vevacuated, and right now somewhere from here to there is where the storm is expected to hit. we're going to take cover when we have to. we're in a position that's somewhat prekd prekted. it's enough protected we feel safe enough. again, things are deteriorating very quickly by the hour. >> all right. >> reporter: back to you guys. >> thank you, ro
. >> the fear is it's going to be worse than irene. >> tonight full reports from up and down the east coast. >> it's only a matter of time as this system gets closer. >> governor martin o'malley over the battering in baltimore. and ted strickland on what the storm means for the political storm in ohio. >>> good to have you with us tonight, folks. sandy is expected to make landfall at this hour on the coast of new jersey. the storm is now a post tropical cyclo cyclone. the path on the northeast corridor has been slow and moving very wide. hundreds of thousands of people in coastal areas have been evacuated up and down the east coast. this is a live shot from delaware. we'll get a live update from the shoreline in just a moment. authorities say new york city and long island could get the worst of the storm surge. sea water could rise up to 11 feet. the damage from sandy was on display hundreds of feet above manhattan today. you're seeing a youtube video of a crane collapsing on the 57th street high-rise. city officials say workers would not be able to access the crane to keep it from falling.
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
summer's hurricane irene cost more than $15.8 billion in damages after hitting an area from north carolina to maine. in 1972 hurricane agnes did more than $11.7 billion of damage. it went from florida to long island, new york. let's check in with bill karins. he is a upstairs. where is it now and where is it headed in the next few hours? >>> it's amazing it's safely off the shore. it's not causing too much damage or chaos yet. we'll watch landfall this evening probably around 8 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. that's when the destruction will be done during the high tide cycle and the winds. this morning is not horrible. here's the new forecast in the hurricane center. it increases in intensity. it could go up to 90 miles per hour. a healthy category one just off the "jersey shore." it will make the hook. the unusual historic cal hook to the left into the jersey shore. the winds will be in the center including from the central jersey shore. possibility of 80 mile per hour winds. we may be out there on the tip of long island, somewhere on the south shore be able to get a gust to 90. that's very,
a tropical storm force. >> bill: how does this compare to irene? >> irene -- it is bigger in diameter and in terms of forward speed it is moving slower. let's take new york city for example. it is the worst case sen their you in terms of what is the worst side of the storm you could be on? when you are on the eastern quadrant that is usually where the winds are the strongest and that's why we're expecting the high water rise. >> bill: all right. ray stagich on such a busy day you are so good to spend time with us. appreciate it. >> all right. thank you. >> bill: nobody knows it better than these guys. is what they live for, and we depend on them. >> yeah. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." ♪ because again, we're in the oh my goodness! oh my gosh this looks amazing! that's a good deal! [ man ] wow! it is so good! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15 entrees under $15 seafood, chicken and more! oo! the tilapia with roasted vegetables! i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. you so fascinated by the prices, you
,000 by hurricane irene 2011 quote the largest storm related outage in our history and again, 1.2 million, pl and without electricity at this hour and we're going to keep following this for you, they had 25,000 power crews on stand by that they brought in according to pepco, the utility in washington d.c. and 25,000 men and women additional force flown in from mexico, canada, and washington state poise today dispatch the crews. charles: it's a herculean effort or a herculean task. a lot of people without power, thanks, adam. >> you've got it. charles: joining us a spokeman for con-ed, the utility company in new york city, alfonso, can you fill us in on how things are looking. >> sure thing. the updated number for people in new york city and westchester county and that number is actually 729,000 customers out throughout new york city and westchester county and we're looking at about, in manhattan, where the bulk of them are at at this point, 240,000 customers out. charles: alfonso, how does con edison assess where to go initially, to to help initially, is there a system for figuring out priori
with irene, and it will go only higher, probably a couple more feet before all is said and done. we have a lot of concerns to deal with. there are power outages that may last for weeks, millions without power very likely. back to you. >> thank you for the update now. let's go to point pleasant in new jersey along the jersey shore. ron, we have information that the strong possibility of rapid water rising in the area where you are right now. we see the angry sea behind you. >> reporter: yes, tamron, we've been watching out for rouge waves splashing up here. some have come up along this dune here. right now the wind is really, really ripping. it's been getting stronger and stronger. the rain is coming sideways, and i can feel all this sand hitting my back as it's coming up and flying in this direction as well. back here you can see these waves. they're about 8 to 10 feet tall. all day they're getting closer and closer. under normal conditions the beach actually extends about 100 yards back in that direction all along this shore. this dune i'm standing on is about 12 feet tall and 30 yards
people, customers, without power in new jersey now as after hurricane irene a year ago and gives you a sense of the depth of the problem here. 60% of the state does not have power. and again, it's going to take a while. yes, there is some frustration but i think people are understanding that this is a really severe calamity that hit this place and you can see along the jersey shore places like this, a beach front property, a restaurant obliterated and what president obama and governor christie are seeing as they fly up and down the shoreline. we saw marine one go by in a convoy with helicopters about ten minutes ago and making their rounds. but i don't think a lot of people expect a lot from the federal government in the short term. >> yeah. >> right now people are just trying to deal with their immediate needs, moving in with neighbors, staying with friends. we have heard reports that some utility companies are talking about perhaps turning off water services, for example, because there could be contamination in the system. people are hunkering down and the work is just beginning. i
's warmest year since recordkeeping began in 1895. and it's just over a year ago that hurricane irene caused record flooding in the northeast. but with sandy came new records and according to new york governor andrew cuomo, more pressure for governments to act. >> i joke that every two years we have a 100 year flood. the frequency is way up. it is not prudent, to sit here, i believe, at this point and say, well it's not going to happen again. once you have that recognition, then what are you doing about it. and what design changes, what construction changes are you making to deal with it. >> suarez: as new york struggles to recover from sandy, cuomo looked to the long-term, calling for a "fundamental rethinking of our built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make
didn't see a whole lot of lights on. a few stayed because irene wasn't so bad. they're going to take their chances on sandy. mayor bloomberg says that's the worst thing you can do, because when you get in trouble and call for help, you're not only endangering your life, you you endanger the life of the emergency responder who comes to help you. chris, back to you. >> they have a lot of shelters set up. anne thompson, thank you so much for the update. >>> we should mention in sports the san francisco giants are world series champs for the second time in three years. they beat the detroit tigers 4-3 in game four last night. a sweep of the series. >>> back in manhattan sandy shut down the stock market. this is the first time this has happened since 9/11. mandy drury is here. could be closed tomorrow i understand. >> that's right, chris. if the nyse is closed tomorrow as well, that's the first time since 1888 that a weather-related event has caused a two-day shutdown. the last time was a blizzard that left drifts as high as 40 feet in the streets of new york city. chris, there have been
outages. they had hundreds of thousands of people without power during irene last year. they expect the same this year, probably even worse. they are thinking maybe as many as 600,000 without power for days to come. again the surge is really going to be problem here. we'll see that later in the evening and into tomorrow. matt? >> we spoke to connecticut's governor daniel malloy earlier this morning. he said this storm is one of the biggest threats to human life in his state in years. i began by asking governor malloy what worries him specifically about sandy. >> it's the next two tides. could experience tides this afternoon at about what the perfect storm was. tonight's tide during the nighttime hours could be twice that, and that's our biggest worry. if that happens it really is catastrophic. the amount of damage and loss of property is going to be extreme. we've been talking about it for days. we've prepared. we have people trying places. we have equipment in the right places. really we're waiting to see what mother nature throws at us. let's be clear. this storm is staying on scr
. if i have to look at what was done in the aftermath of irene just as an example i think people were generally pleased with -- you know, with the results and with fema. i know a lot of times they get beat up because obviously when somebody comes in the middle of a disaster, you know, there's a lot of decisions that have to be made on the spot and sometimes they don't seem to be the right ones but i think overall fema does a good job. >> bill: are they responsive when you contact them regarding particular problems in your district? >> oh, absolutely. and we're going to really need them after this storm. no question about that. the other thing i should mention, too, is that when we do a lot of the beach replenishment projects or other federal projects with the army corps i think people don't realize a lot of it is -- you know, is preventives. in other words, in a place like seabright or monmouth beach if you didn't have the sand, the hurricane's consequences would be a lot worse. >> bill: right. >> so it is also preve
, but they remember when irene barreled through the northeast here last year, the atlantic ocean in some places even touching the bay. so, we're talking about 11 foot storm surge and 20 foot waves on top of that potentially and a nightmare and hitting us harder later in the day. back to you. charles: anna kooiman in long island. well, we saw the acts of desperation, stops of president obama pulling out the stops to get reelected and that'ssnext. we'll ask a democratic strategist in one of those acts of desperation, this ad, will actually work. >> he wanted to be with a great guy. a guy with beautiful, cares and understands about women. [ male announcer ] how do you trade? with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from thought to trade, on every screen. and all in real time. which makes it just like having your own trading floor, right at your fingertips. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just e start. try our easy-to-use scottrader streaming quotes. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. why
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toé@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
are open as of now. expectations are almost 12 foot storm surge. irene at 9 in comparison just to give you an idea of what we're looking at here. we're also starting to see some twitter pictures come in of the main fishing pier in ocean city, maryland being washed away. pictures of atlantic city underwater. it is a little tricky for us to put emphasis on campaign developments knowing what's to come weatherwise and that obviously is of the utmost concern especially in people safety but we do only have eight days left. that means weighing the impact on everything from early voting of course now to access and power to the polling places on election day itself. it is harder to get out the vote door knocking when people can't get out and about. the millions of dollars that conservatives have saved up to bombard the airways in the homestretch may be waste if the no one can watch tv. and even the news itself is going to be all storm all the time at least until the worst seemed to have past. it will change the nature of th
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)